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Yeast Infection (Candida Vaginal Infection)

Image showing a cross-section of the uterus, with Fallopian tubes, ovaries, cervix, and vagina.

You have a Candida vaginal infection. This is also known as a yeast infection. It's most often caused by a type of yeast (fungus) called Candida. Candida are normally found in the vagina. But if they increase in number, this can lead to infection and cause symptoms.

Symptoms of a yeast infection can include:

  • Clumpy or thin, white discharge, which may look like cottage cheese

  • Itching or burning

  • Burning with urination

Certain factors can make a yeast infection more likely. These can include:

  • Taking certain medicines, such as antibiotics or birth control pills

  • Pregnancy

  • Diabetes

  • Weak immune system

A yeast infection is most often treated with antifungal medicine. This may be given as a vaginal cream or pills you take by mouth. Treatment may last for about 1 to 7 days. Women with severe or recurrent infections may need longer courses of treatment.

Home care

  • If you’re prescribed medicine, be sure to use it as directed. Finish all of the medicine, even if your symptoms go away. Don’t try to treat yourself using over-the-counter products without talking with your provider first. They will let you know if this is a good option for you.

  • Ask your provider what steps you can take to help reduce your risk of having a yeast infection in the future.

Follow-up care

Follow up with your healthcare provider, or as directed.

When to seek medical advice

Call your healthcare provider right away if:

  • You have a fever of 100.4ºF (38ºC) or higher, or as directed by your provider.

  • Your symptoms worsen, or they don’t go away within a few days of starting treatment.

  • You have new pain in the lower belly or pelvic region.

  • You have side effects that bother you or a reaction to the cream or pills you’re prescribed.

  • You or any partners you have sex with have new symptoms, such as a rash, joint pain, or sores.

Online Medical Reviewer: Daniel N Sacks MD
Online Medical Reviewer: Donna Freeborn PhD CNM FNP
Online Medical Reviewer: Heather Trevino
Date Last Reviewed: 7/1/2020
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